WHAT WE DO

Paint it Red aims to
empower communities

By providing them with the tools necessary to combat & eliminate stereotypes around periods,
creating a space for menstrual rights
and reducing period poverty.
The remaining 64% use traditional methods
which include the use of hay, sand, ash and rags among many which
cause an increased risk
of infection, cervical cancer and reproductive issues.
We center our activities to
promote menstrual rights and address the existing lacunae in proper menstruation facilities accessed by women in India. We believe menstruation to be a fundamental human right which should be accorded to every women.

The Founder’s Fellowship

Looking to kickstart your career in the social impact sector? Apply to the Founder’s Fellowship at Paint It Red, a paid opportunity for skilled and highly-motivated individuals to be groomed by our founding team in leading and managing an NGO.

Last date to apply: 25th September

CAMPAIGNS
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Bleed In Peace

With the onset of the COVID crisis, we distributed Menstrual hygiene kits to women and girls as relief material, under our campaign ‘Bleed in Peace’.

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Talk Period To Me

‘Talk Period to Me’ was a series of engaging dialogues in collaboration with TruCup and Paint It Red, focussing on sustainable menstruation.

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Say It With A Pin

One of India’s first menstruation-themed pins. With every purchase of this pin, one womxn's complete menstrual needs for 2 years are covered.

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Art Sale

Paint It Red initiated an art exhibition to raise funds for procuring and distributing reusable cloth pads across semi-urban and rural India.

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MISSION

” Every Menstruator can find pride in their periods “

Period Poverty
Period poverty is the lack of access to sanitary products, menstrual hygiene education, toilets and all other facilities which are vital for menstruating girls and women.

More than 71% girls remain unaware of what menstruation is to begin with. 40% of schools lack toilets making it difficult for girls to manage their periods. As a result, India sees more than 60% girls missing school on account of menstruation. Only 12% of the 355 million menstruating girls and women in India have access to sanitary products.

Menstrual Rights

Menstrual rights are an inherent part of human dignity and by extension Human Rights. Improper access to menstrual rights results in essential human rights like the right to education, health, work and gender equality being disrupted. Thus, to uphold the ethos of human rights which includes equality, non-discrimination, transparency, participation, accountability and access to information, inclusion of menstrual hygiene in state agendas is important.

Menstrual Education

Menstrual education in India remains abysmal. 71% of adolescent girls are not aware of what menstruation is. The lack of education results in menstruation being taboo, a shame, and the continued association of girls who menstruate to be seen as impure.

Awareness campaigns, workshops, interactive sessions to normalize menstruation is imperative to achieve the goals of sustainable menstrual hygiene practices in India.

Access To Products

Only 12% of menstruating girls and women have access to sanitary napkins in India. Of 355 million menstruating women, merely 44 million have access to clean and hygienic sanitary products. The remaining use traditional methods such as unclean cloth, ash, hay, grass and sacks of sand.

Period Poverty

Period poverty is the lack of access to sanitary products, menstrual hygiene education, toilets and all other facilities which are vital for menstruating girls and womxn.

More than 71% girls remain unaware of what menstruation is to begin with. 40% of schools lack toilets making it difficult for girls to manage their periods. As a result, India sees more than 60% girls missing school on account of menstruation. 12% of the 355 million menstruating girls and womxn in India do not have access to sanitary products.

Menstrual Rights

Menstrual rights are an inherent part of human dignity and by extension Human Rights. Improper access to menstrual rights results in essential human rights like the right to education, health, work and gender equality being disrupted. Thus, to uphold the ethos of human rights which includes equality, non-discrimination, transparency, participation, accountability and access to information, inclusion of menstrual hygiene in state agendas is important.

Menstrual Education

Menstrual education in India remains abysmal. 71% of adolescent girls are not aware of what menstruation is. The lack of education results in menstruation being taboo, a shame, and the continued association of girls who menstruate to be seen as impure.

Awareness campaigns, workshops, interactive sessions to normalize menstruation is imperative to achieve the goals of sustainable menstrual hygiene practices in India.

Access To Products

Only 12% of menstruating girls and womxn have access to sanitary napkins in India. Of 355 million menstruating womxn, merely 44 million have access to clean and hygienic sanitary products. The remaining use traditional methods such as unclean cloth, ash, hay, grass and sacks of sand.

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